Sound the alarm! Climb inside our 24-foot fire truck and hit the lights and siren. Practice making an escape plan and find your way through a dark tunnel! Grab your gear and slide down the firehouse pole to put out the flames. Don’t forget to work with you firehouse companion, PAL, EdVenture’s one and only Dalmatian pup.

 

What are we learning?

  • Social & Emotional Development
  • Developing Motor Skills
  • Communication Skills
  • Safety Awareness
  • Experiential Learning through Role Play

 

 

  • Concrete learning experiences
  • Recall skills (memory)
  • Predicting patterns and outcomes
  • Technological understanding
  • Fire Safety
  • Analytical thinking
  • Recall skills (memory)
  • Predict patterns and outcomes
  • Technological understanding
  • Fire Safety

 

  • Toddlers and preschoolers are not too young to begin learning about fire and life safety practices. Take advantage of the inviting atmosphere of Dalmatian Station to introduce things like the color and size of a real fire truck or what a firefighter wears. Fire can be scary, but learning about it doesn’t have to be.
  • Engage the youngest of visitors by identifying colors, shapes, and other stimulating objects in the exhibit. Play a game of “I Spy” to find all the colors in the rainbow.
  • Help them put on a fire jacket and explore the inside of the fire truck. Role playing broadens perceptions and encourages imagination.
  • Climbing the stairs, pressing buttons, crawling through the tunnel or even being assisted for a slide down the fire pole build motor skills and encourage self-confidence.

 

  • Explore the inside of the firetruck with your child. Inside you’ll find fire jackets for the kids to wear, and videos about real firefighters. Ride with your child in the front of the truck on an imaginary call to rescue. 
  • Join in on the Rookie Fire Fighter Training interactive that explains different types of fires and proper procedures for extinguishing them. Use this opportunity to emphasize that even extinguishing fires should be done in a safe way. 
  • Participate in the Escape Artist interactive with your child. At the conclusion, ask them what they learned. Ask them which part they enjoyed most. Dialing 911? Using the hand plates to crawl? Ask if they remember why those things are important. 
  • Take a seat with your child in the “Home Safe Home,” 4D theatre show. After the show, ask them what kind of things you could do at home to prevent fires from starting. 
  • Help your child email a fire escape plan home from the Make an Escape Plan interactive. At home, review all of the information and help them draw a floor plan of where you live to use in creating a safe escape plan.

 

  • Encourage your child to role-play in the exhibit. Start with receiving the fire call from the dispatcher, putting on the fire equipment, driving to the fire, sliding down the fire pole, and crawling safely through the smoke tunnel. All in a day’s work for a firefighter. 
  • Join in on the Rookie Fire Fighter Training interactive that explains different types of fires and proper procedures for extinguishing them. Use this opportunity to emphasize that even extinguishing fires should be done in a safe way. 
  • Participate in the Escape Artist interactive with your child. At the conclusion, ask them what they learned. Ask them which part they enjoyed most. Dialing 911? Using the hand plates to crawl? Ask if they remember why those things were important.
  • Help your child email a fire escape plan home from the Make an Escape Plan interactive. At home, review all of the information and help them draw a floor plan of where you live to use in creating a safe escape plan.
  • Turn the life-saving actions of “Stop, Drop and Roll” into a game. Start with moving to music. Stop the music, just like in musical chairs. Shout “STOP. DROP. And ROLL” doing each action with your child. Applaud a successful and safe escape! Reverse roles and let your child stop the music and call out the drill.
  • Show your child how different noises alert us to things. The beep of the microwave when the food is done. The ring of the doorbell or the buzz of the alarm clock. Include the sound of the smoke detector in this exercise to show it is very loud, but just another sound to get our attention.
  • Teach your child about potential “hot spots” in your house that they should never play with or touch. Potential “hot spots” may include: a stove, an oven, outlets, candles, irons, matches, lighters, or a fireplace.

 

  • Plan a visit to a local fire station. Ask the firefighters to show your child their gear, a fire truck, and other things they use in their work. Seeing an actual firefighter in a fun way will help your little one feel more confident and not afraid of firefighters in case of a true emergency. 
  • Show your child where smoke detectors are located in your home, and what to do when one goes off. Let them help when its time to test or replace the batteries.
  • Go outside and, using what was learned at EdVenture, decide together where the best meeting place would be for everyone in the household in the event of a fire emergency. Go back inside and walk through a drill to decide the best exits to get out of the house or apartment quickly and safely.

 

  • Plan a visit to a local fire station. Ask the firefighters to show your child their gear, a fire truck, and other things they use in their work. Seeing an actual firefighter in a fun way will help your little one feel more confident and not afraid of firefighters in case of a true emergency. 
  • Show your child where smoke detectors are located in your home, and what to do when one goes off. Let them help when its time to test or replace the batteries.
  • Go outside and, using what was learned at EdVenture, decide together where the best meeting place would be for everyone in the household in the event of a fire emergency. Go back inside and walk through a drill to decide the best exits to get out of the house or apartment quickly and safely.
  • Arthur’s Fire Drill 
    By Marc Brown
  • Curious George and the Firefighters
    By Margret & H.A. Rey
  • Spark the Firefighter
    By Stephen Krensky
  • STOP, DROP, and ROLL
    By Margery Cuyler
  • The Fire Engine Book
    By Golden Books and Tibor Gergely
  • Sparky the Fire Dog
    By Don Hoffman and Todd Dakins
  • Clifford the Firehouse Dog
    By Norman Bridwell
  • Firefighters A to Z
    By Chris L. Demarest
  • Firefighter Frank
    By Monica Wellington
  • Big Frank’s Fire Truck
    By Leslie McGuire
  • Fireboy to the Rescue!: A Fire Safety Book
    By Edward Miller
  • Sparky the Fire Dog
    By Don Hoffman and Todd Dakins
  • No Dragons for Tea: Fire Safety for Kids (and Dragons)
    By Jean E Pendziwol
  • The Stikmens Family Learning Fire Safety & Gets Something New
    By C Franklin Holmes Jr
  • Fire! Fire! 
    By Gail Gibbon
Hours Monday - Sunday: 9 a.m. - 5 p.m.
Admission
Members Free
Children and Adults $11.50
Seniors (age 62+) $10.50
Military (with ID) $10.50
Educator (with ID) $10.50
Groups (15+ w/RSVP) $8.50
Children under two Free