Try farming and fruit picking on for size. At the Busy Bee Farm there’s work to be done for everyone! It’s never too early to plant the seed of farming education. Learn about the different types of crops grown in South Carolina. Send the dairy off to the factory for bottling. Gather eggs from the chicken coop where hens make eggs all day, every day. Pick delicious peaches from the trees and put them in a basket. Don’t forget to carry the fruit and crops to the loading dock so it can be sold at the neighborhood market. Farming fun is always buzzing at Busy Bee Farm!

What are we learning?

  • Fine and gross motor skills
  • Sorting and counting
  • Recognizing colors and shapes
  • Communication skills
  • Imaginative play
  • Developing the five senses

 

 

  • Gross motor skills
  • Large muscle building
  • Social awareness and collaboration
  • Spatial awareness
  • Farm to Table Concept 

 

 

  • Gross motor skills
  • Large muscle building
  • Social awareness and collaboration
  • Analytical thinking
  • Patterns and outcomes
  • Farm to Table
  • While picking peaches with your child, talk about their size, shape and color. Have them count the number of peaches they pick. 
  • Trying to milk the cow develops fine motor skills. Ask your child if they understand what is happening and make the connection that the milk we drink comes from cows. 
  • Point to the cow, and the chicken, the tractor and the busy bee. Have you child make the sounds of each.
  • Develop your child’s senses. Have them touch different textures in the exhibit and have them describe how they feel - hard, soft, rough, smooth?. 
    Ask your child what sounds they hear. What noise does the cow make? Ask them to look for things that are green or orange or yellow.

 

  • Start a conversation about the top cash crops of fruits and vegetables grown in SC, including peaches, sweet potatoes, peanuts and soybeans. 
  • Have your child milk the cow and collect chicken eggs. Discuss other foods that animals (livestock) provide us. Discuss how food gets from the farm to our tables. 
  • Climbing up on the tractor engages both gross motor skills and imagination. Ask your child what they think would be the most exciting thing about being a farmer. 
  • Head over to the vegetable garden and plant vegetables with your child. Start a conversation with your child about what plants need to live and grow - light, water, soil nutrients, air, etc.

 

  • Start a conversation about the top cash crops of fruits and vegetables grown in SC, including peaches, sweet potatoes, peanuts and soybeans.
  • While your child is milking the cow, collecting chicken eggs, or picking peaches, start a discussion about the farm to table concept. Talk to your child about how the farm, grocery store, and diner are all related. 
  • Discuss how important tractors are to farming. Talk about the many ways a tractor can be used on a farm – plowing, harvesting, pulling other equipment.
  • Start a conversation with your child about how important it is to buy local fruits and vegetables to support South Carolina farmers. 

  • Plant a vegetable garden in your yard or in a flowerpot with your child. Show them how to care for a plant and talk about all of the things a plant will need to grow and be healthy.
  • Practice learning colors and counting with different fruits and vegetables. Ask your child to find the red fruit or the green vegetable. Then ask your child to pick up two fruits or vegetables, then three, and so on.
  • Walk with your child at the park or down the street and point our all the different types of plants that grow everywhere. Point out that some have flowers and some just have leaves. Help collect a variey of leaves and then have your child sort them by size, color, etc.

 

  • Make a trip to a local farmers market to see how vegetables are transported, unloaded, sorted and sold.
  • Use an egg carton as a small planting container where your child can grow their own crop of their choice. Fill each hole with soil and help them plant seeds in each. Allow them to water and care for the seedlings.
  • Plan an excursion to a real farm. SC has many farms for the public to pick their own fruits and vegetables. When you are there, ask what parts of the farm are like Busy Bee Farm at EdVenture.

 

 

  • Visit a local farmer’s market at different times of the year. Talk with your child about how the fruits and vegetables available change with the seasons. 
  • Encourage healthy eating by letting your child choose vegetable from the market they would like to try. Involve them in the cooking and serving of the vegetable. Take this opportunity to talk about vitamins and other nutrients found in vegetable and fruits. 
  • Plan an excursion to a real farm. SC has many farms for the public to pick their own fruits and vegetables. When you are there, ask what parts of the farm are like Busy Bee Farm at EdVenture.

 

  • John Deere Touch and Feel: Tractor
    By Parachute Press, DK Publishing
  • Tremendous Tractors
    By Tony Mitton
  • Farm 123
    By Parachute Press
  • We’re Going to the Farmer’s Market
    By Stefan Page
  • On the Farm
    By David Elliot
  • Farmyard Beat
    By Lindsey Craig
  • Apples
    By Gail Gibbons
  • Milk: From Cow to Carton
    By Aliki
  • A Weed is a Flower: The Life of George Washington Carver
    By Aliki
  • Corn
    By Gail Gibbons
  • To Market, to Market
    By Nikki McClure
  • Unusual Chickens for the Exceptional Poultry Farmer
    By Kelly Jones
  • Farmer Boy
    By Laura Ingalls Wilder
  • Harris and Me
    By Gary Paulsen
  • Seedfolks
    By Paul Fleischman
Calendar
Hours Monday - Sunday: 9 a.m. - 5 p.m.
Admission
Members Free
Children and Adults $11.50
Seniors (age 62+) $10.50
Military (with ID) $10.50
Educator (with ID) $10.50
Groups (15+ w/RSVP) $8.50
Children under two Free