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Ingenuity and imagination converge in our amazing maker workshop. Designed for ages five and older, Maker Works has materials and tools to help ideas take flight.

Open Make

Spark your maker spirit with inspiring workstations and walls. Design a wind-powered creation or build a cardboard metropolis. Your mind’s the limit! 

Tinker Tech

Minds open in a maker garage. Step in to work with circuits, solder wires, and swap switches, pieces and parts to create your own technogizmos and whatchamacallits. (Check the monthly calendar for exciting programs!)

Aha Factory

There’s a real art to creativity. Get your hands moving, make prints, fold origami, assemble a collage or sculpt a masterpiece.

KAPLA Creation Room

Guests from toddlers to adults will use their imaginations to build anything from basic towers to advanced architecture with KAPLA blocks. From simplified structures to amazing elephants, the blocks are used as an educational tool worldwide by schools and educators, as they enhance both intellectual and manual abilities. Playing with KAPLA improves focus, dexterity and understand of science and engineering concepts as well as helps develop creative problem-solving.

 

What are we learning?

  • Maker Works is designed for children 5 and up.

 

 

  • Fine motor skills
  • Problem Solving
  • Cause and effect
  • Core principles of physics
  • Materials science
  • Trial and error
  • Self confidence
  • Fine motor skills
  • Problem Solving
  • Cause and effect
  • Core principles of physics
  • Deductive reasoning
  • Materials science
  • Trial and error
  • Self confidence
  • Maker Works is designed for children 5 and up.
  • View ideas and resources for making at home below.
  • Sit with your child and make your own creation as they make theirs. Help them develop ideas by doing rather than instructing. Allow them to make their own choices.
  • Encourage risk taking and testing, deconstruction, rebuilding and retesting.
  • Engage in conversation about the experience of making something with no instructions. Ask how that makes them feel about what they are doing.
  • In The Aha Factory, encourage experimentation with color, shape, line, texture, etc. work.
  • Sit with your child and make your own creation as they make theirs. Encourage experimentation and trial and error through making, testing, deconstructing, rebuilding and retesting. Let your child determine when success has been achieved.
  • Encourage your child to discuss what they are making and what they plan for the end result to be. Will it balance? Will it roll? What gave them the idea?
  • Engage in conversation about the experience of making something with no instructions or experimenting with materials. Ask what professions work with experiments or build things for testing. Ask why it is important to experiment.
  • In The Aha Factory, encourage experimentation with color, shape, line, texture, etc. work.
  • Encourage your child to play in, crawl through and build with cardboard boxes.
  • Work with open-ended construction materials like Duplo blocks or Play Dough to encourage creative thinking problem solving
  • Begin to introduce simple tools like a hammer, a screwdriver, a ruler, and scissors. Demonstrate how they are used to make things.
  • Have your child help measure, mix, stir, pour ingredients for cookies, cupcakes, etc. Make them aware of the tools they are using and how each has a special purpose.
  • Encourage creativity and problem solving by providing just tape and cardboard and give your child the open-ended challenge to see what they can make.
  • Have your child start their own maker workshop by saving and sorting bottle caps, wine corks, toilet paper/paper towel rolls, and plastic bottles to use in making.
  • Use broken items, such as toys or old computers, and engage in a take-apart session. With supervision, let your child use a screwdriver to expose the inner workings of things. (Watch for any sharp or hazardous objects inside)
  • Create monster dolls and other imaginative creatures by taping, gluing or wiring pieces and parts into new playthings.
  • Encourage creativity and problem solving by providing just tape and cardboard and give your child the open-ended challenge to see what they can make.
  • Have your child start their own maker workshop by saving and sorting bottle caps, wine corks, toilet paper/paper towel rolls, and plastic bottles to use in making.
  • Use broken items, such as toys or old computers, and engage in a take-apart session. With supervision, let your child use a screwdriver to expose the inner workings of things. (Watch for any sharp or hazardous objects inside)
  • Turn making into a group activity with the entire family or use it as a theme for a birthday party or sleepover.

 

 

 

  • 10 Button Book
    by Accorsi, William
  • Mouse Paint
    By Ellen Walsh
  • Mistakes that Worked
    By Charlotte Foltz Jones
  • The Dot
    By Peter H. Reynolds
  • The Art of Tinkering
    By Karen Wilkinson & Mike Petrich
  • Make:
    Magazine by Maker Media
Hours Monday - Sunday: 9 a.m. - 5 p.m.
Admission
Members Free
Children and Adults $11.50
Seniors (age 62+) $10.50
Military (with ID) $10.50
Educator (with ID) $10.50
Groups (15+ w/RSVP) $8.50
Children under two Free